Snowday Chickpea Blondies

This morning I woke up and saw that nature (and my car) was covered in a thick sheet of snow.  My email inbox was flooded with alerts from my internship program notifying us that we are not in session today due to the weather conditions (yay! Snowday!).  Snowdays are a perfect time to relax and in my case, get creative in the kitchen.  I decided to whip up these chickpea blondies after feeling inspired by my blackbean brownies that I made a few weeks ago.  If it’s snowing where you are and you’re feeling adventurous, feel free to try these delicious, fiber-packed blondies for a treat 🙂

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

Ingredients:

  • 15 oz. canned chickpeas, rinsed
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 tbsp. unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 cup mini vegan chocolate chips (I used Enjoy Life brand)

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Use non-stick spray to spray a 9×9″ baking pan.  Set aside the baking pan as the oven pre-heats.  In a food processor, add all ingredients except chocolate chips.  Using the food processor, mix all ingredients until everything is uniform.  Turn off the food processor, add chocolate chips and using a spoon mix the chocolate chips into the batter.  Using a spoon or spatula, scoop the batter into the pan and bake for 25-30 minutes.  Remove from oven, allow to cool, and enjoy!

Stay warm and safe

-Jess

 

Advertisements

Nuggets on a Budget

My name is Jessie Valentine and I have a confession to make:  I am completely obsessed with the soy nuggets at Whole Foods Market!  I first found these delicious little meatless nuggets of bliss a few years ago while circling ’round the salad bar and since then I’ve been hooked.  Unfortunately for my wallet, a 1 lb. container of soy nuggets typically cost about $10, and as someone who is on a food budget, I wanted to find a way to make my own (similar) type of soy nugget.

The consistency of the soy nuggets at WFM are like a less chewy/spongy version of seitan.  If you’ve never tried seitan, it’s a meat replacement made up of wheat gluten and typically seasoned with soy sauce or some kind of vegetable broth base.  For my version of soy nuggets, I used soy flour along with vital wheat gluten.  You can buy vital wheat gluten and soy flour at any health food store.  It’s typically found in the baking/flour section.  I used Bob’s Red Mill brand for both.

For flavor, I used three different marinades, thus making three different flavors of these nuggets.  Feel free to use whatever you have available or if you have a certain flavor in mind (spicy, teriyaki, bbq, etc.) use dressings/sauces/seasonings that you prefer.

I hope you try this recipe and feel inspired to make your own homemade versions of your favorite foods. 

Protein-Packed Vegan Nuggets (serves 4)

Processed with VSCO with f1 preset

I served mine with some brown rice, beans, and veggies. 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup vital wheat gluten
  • 1/2 cup soy flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp. soy sauce
  • seasonings- (choose whatever you want).  I made three varieties-  a teriyaki/seseame flavor (teriyaki sauce + sesame seeds), a buffalo sauce flavored variety (I used buffalo sauce marinade) and a spicy variety (I mixed taco seasoning + hot sauce.  Caution: muy caliente).
IMG_4564

Three varieties fresh from the oven

Directions

  • In a large mixing bowl, combine wheat gluten, soy flour, and water.  This combination will create a dough.  Knead and stretch the dough for a minute or so.
  • Cut the dough into small, bite-size pieces (nuggets)
  • Boil water in a large pot.  When the water comes to a boil, drop the nuggets into the dough, piece-by-piece
  • Lower the water to a simmer (it should not be boiling as the nuggets cook).  If the water is boiling, the nuggets will come out chewy and rubbery.
  • Allow the nuggets to simmer in water for 1 hour
  • Remove from heat and drain using a colander.  The nuggets should have expanded.  Allow to cool a bit.
  • Now, for the flavoring-  in a ziplock bag, allow the nuggets to marinate in whatever sauce/seasoning you choose for 1 hour-overnight (your choice).
  • After the nuggets have marinated to your liking, preheat the oven to 350°F
  • Spray cooking spray on a cookie tin or baking pan (both will work) and place the nuggets on the pan.  If you’d like, you can add more sauce at this point, as some will evaporate as the nuggets bake in the oven
  • Bake the nuggets for 20-30 minutes
  • Remove from the oven, allow to cool, and enjoy

 

-Jess

A moment to breathe

Processed with VSCO with f1 preset

Ah…that is my sigh of relief because I’m officially on “vacation” from my internship rotations for the next two weeks.  Yesterday was the last day of my community rotation.  If you read my last post, I’ve been working with the senior population, mostly in the scope of the meals-on-wheels program and other community programs for senior citizens.  I didn’t know what to expect of my community rotation.  Before I got into the dietetic internship, I worked in community nutrition as a nutritionist for the Women, Infants, Children (WIC) program, so I did have some experience in public health but clearly the WIC program is quite different than a program for senior citizens.  Anyway, my community rotation was fantastic.  I loved working with seniors and sharing nutrition knowledge.  If you read my last post, this rotation involved some public speaking along with making healthy baked goods to share with individuals at senior community centers, which was fun!  During this rotation, I had an amazing preceptor that truly wants interns to succeed and learn from each rotation which made it an overall positive experience.

I’m looking forward to this little break from the internship.  I’m hoping that I’ll have more time to devote to yoga, painting, running, taking long walks outside (my vitamin D levels are probably so low right now, thanks to winter), and just enjoying the holiday season.  I hope you have time to reconnect with yourself, too.

-Jess

What I’ve BEAN up to

Greetings readers!  I hope everyone enjoyed their Thanksgiving and got to spend some quality time relaxing.  I was lucky to have Thanksgiving off from my rotations and spent time with my family and friends.  Having a few days off from the dietetic internship allowed me to relax and reflect on the completion of my long term care rotation.  In my last blog post, I wrote about how the LTC rotation was a little challenging.  I found that particular rotation to be challenging because I didn’t have much clinical experience prior to starting, and I really didn’t know what to expect.  Although the rotation wasn’t the easiest for me, I learned so much about the needs of the geriatric population and how a medical team (involving registered dietitians, doctors, nurses/nursing staff, physical/occupational therapists, psychologists, social workers, and speech-language pathologists) must work together to assess the health of each resident at the long term care facility.  Malnutrition is a major health/nutrition-related concern for aged individuals and the most important component of geriatric nutrition is preventing weight loss.  Making sure that elderly individuals eat enough calories and protein was a huge part of what I learned as an intern during my last rotation.

In my current rotation, which is community-based, I’m working with the same population (seniors), but this rotation is less clinically-focused.  I’ve been learning about and getting involved in programs that prepare and deliver meals to homebound senior citizens.  I’ve also been learning more about geriatric nutrition and food quality of meals that are served at community senior centers.  I’ve really been enjoying this experience so far and I love that I can apply knowledge I gained from interning at the long term care facility in this rotation.  I also love cooking and preparing food, and part of this rotation involves observing food prep and being in the kitchens where the food is prepared.

Next week, I’m going to be doing a presentation at a few senior centers on the topic of beans and how to incorporate more beans into ones’ diet.  I’m particularly excited about this topic because if you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you know I love beans and I love coming up with creative ways to eat them.  For this presentation, I’m going to make some delicious black bean brownies to show the seniors that beans can be prepared and added to foods in an unexpected way.   While I can’t take credit for the idea of this recipe, I tried to add my own personal touch from this black bean brownie recipe that I adapted from chocolate covered katie.  I plan on sharing these delectable chocolate treats at the presentation.  Hopefully the seniors get excited about eating beans in the form of a dessert!

If you’re not a fan of dark chocolate, feel free to use a sweeter, lighter chocolate.

Black Bean Brownies

IMG_4409

Ingredients

  • 1 (15.5 oz) can of black beans. (I used the low-sodium version and rinsed 2x to get rid of extra salt)
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp. melted coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened apple sauce
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 2.5 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 cup chocolate chips (I used the vegan, semi-sweet variety)
  • (optional- add peanut butter or your favorite nut butter)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350ºF.  In a food processor, mix all of the ingredients except the chocolate chips.  After everything is well mixed, add 3/4 of the chocolate chips, scoop out the mixture and place on a lightly greased 9×9 baking pan.  Top the brownies with the remaining chocolate chips and bake for 18-20 minutes.  Allow to cool before cutting.  Enjoy with a cold glass of almond milk (or your favorite cold bevy!) and share with friends, or a senior citizen who needs some company 🙂

-Jess

 

 

Fall-ing into place

October was such a crazy month, that I didn’t get a chance to write a blog post, so consider this post an extended update.  In addition to starting another rotation of the dietetic internship (DI), I moved into a new apartment in October.  Needless to say, I’ve been a very busy girl these past few months!

I’ll start by sharing some updates about my latest rotations.  I’ve been interning in a long term care facility for the past two months.  My experience at this facility has been divided into two parts:  institutional food service management and clinical long term care.  The food service management rotation was surprisingly fun.  It takes a lot of work and organization to oversee the management of a food service department, especially in a residential/long term care facility.  I learned about forecasting, budgeting, purchasing, and how food is stored and prepared in this facility.  I also got to know the food service staff and presented an inservice on food sanitation and teamwork, which are essential in a food service kitchen.

My second rotation at this same facility has been in the clinical area.  I’ve been working on nutrition assessments of residents in long term care (LTC) while getting to know the residents, their health conditions, and and how to address health problems using evidence-based nutrition interventions.  I’ve found the clinical aspect of this rotation to be a little more challenging than food service, mostly because assessments need to be written in a very particular way and I’m still finding my voice when it comes to making recommendations and writing evaluations.  My advice to anyone else going into a clinical rotation of the DI is to learn from each preceptor and try to see everything as a learning experience, especially if you don’t have much clinical experience prior to starting the internship.

Like I mentioned above, October was super busy due to transitioning from one rotation to the next, all while moving my life into a U-Haul and changing homes.  I absolutely love my new apartment– it’s so roomy, light, and has such a great energy about it.  Growing up, I wanted to be an architect or an interior designer, so I’m having a lot of fun trying to make the best use of space and decorating (on a budget!).

IMG_4188

My new room 🙂

I’m hoping the rest of November will be a little more calm now that I’m settled into my new home and in December, I’ll get a short break from the internship (which is definitely welcomed, because every intern needs a break now and then!).  I’m looking forward to sharing more updates and info when I start my next rotation 🙂

-Jess

Diary of a Dietetic Intern

Processed with VSCO with f1 preset

My life right now summed up in a picture- Dietetics Manuals, case studies, and healthy brain fuel!

Hello again readers!  I’m so excited to write this post/update as an RD-to-be/Dietetic Intern!  My Dietetic Internship (DI) officially started a few weeks ago with a two-week orientation that was jam-packed with projects, assignments, and learning all about what’s to come during the internship.  In case you’re reading my blog for the first time, I’m currently a Dietetic Intern and on my way to becoming a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).  The process of getting accepted into an internship was extremely competitive (my internship has an 11.8% acceptance rate!).  Not only was the application process competitive, but it was also stress-inducing, and time-consuming because I was working on my master’s thesis and working full time as I applied, so I’m elated that I even get to call myself a Dietetic Intern.  Still confused as to what the DI entails?  The DI is a commitment of supervised practice in a variety of rotations, such as clinical/hospital settings, long-term care, community nutrition organizations, renal/dialysis centers, and specific areas of nutrition/dietetics in order to train graduates to enter the field as health professionals (Registered Dietitians/Registered Dietitian-Nutritionists).

I started my first rotation this week at a Long Term Care facility gaining experience in institutional food service management.  It’s been so interesting to learn about food service management and how much work goes into budgeting a menu, planning, overseeing a kitchen, and keeping guests happy.

While I’m not going to share too much details about the specifics about what I’ve been doing while in the internship, I will share how I’ve been managing my time/stress levels and trying to remain sane outside of the DI.  If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you’ll know that I love running and yoga, so I’ve been making it a point to continue doing these things to manage stress and keep fit during this crazy process.  I’ve also been sticking to a food budget and meal planning for myself (…or trying to) because the DI is an unpaid program and a girl’s gotta eat, but also watch her wallet (and waist!).

FullSizeRender (3)

Trail running is my go-to stress relieving activity (and how cool are my tie-dye socks?!)

Processed with VSCO with f1 preset

A typical lunch on the go during this crazy time- Wasa bread sandwiches, raw veggies + hummus, and a fresh, crunchy apple

One thing that really stood out to me during orientation before the rotations actually started was some advice from the DI director– she advised us all to practice self-care in order to help us de-stress.  I really believe self-care and relaxation are so vital to health.  I also think it’s important to make time for friends, relationships, and family, especially because life is so much more than just school + professional commitments.  A few weeks ago my boyfriend and I went apple picking and it was such a a nice way to spend the day while enjoying the outdoors and getting some delicious, locally-grown fruit.  How do you stay sane during busy/stressful times?  I hope whatever  you’re working towards also brings you happiness and (some) time to relax.  I’ll be sure to keep this blog updated throughout the internship, so stop by soon for another post 🙂

 

-Jess

 

 

Balanced on a budget

Processed with VSCO with f1 preset

My balanced food haul on a budget using the tips below

Lately I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about how to budget and plan a healthy, plant-based diet.  If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ll know that I work as a nutritionist for the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, which helps low-income women and children get access to healthy food.  I really love educating and helping my clients make the best food choices, especially because many people think eating healthy is expensive.  Although it can be pricier if you shop at exclusively organic health food markets, healthy eating does not have to cost you your entire paycheck.  Today I’m sharing some tips on how to get the most bang for your buck when it comes to food.  Feel free to share any of your tips or advice by leaving a comment on this post or via facebook or instagram.

1.  Plan your meals

Before you do any food shopping, have a plan of what you’ll be preparing and eating for the next week or weeks to come.  This is super helpful because you don’t want to buy a ton of food but have zero recipe ideas or inspiration.  For inspiration, I like looking at vegan food prep ideas by searching the hashtags #veganmealprep, #veganmealplanning, or similar phrases.  Be realistic with how much time you want to put into preparing your meals and whether you want to prepare your meals for the week ahead of time or on an as-you-go basis.  Keep in mind that some food (especially fresh fruits and veggies) will only stay fresh for several days.

2. Stick to the basics

If you’re on a budget, now is not the time to buy several different varieties of truffle oil and exotic $30 tropical fruits.  Stick with produce that’s in season, and stock up on items that you use on a daily basis (for me, my staples are whole grains such as brown rice, whole wheat pasta, whole grain cereal).  If you feel like treating yourself, choose one specialty item that you’ll use sparingly.  For my “treat”, I like to buy a pint of chocolate coconutmilk vegan icecream, which is about $5-6/pint and treat myself to a serving once a week or less, which really does make it feel like a special occasion treat.

3.  Canned + Frozen are your friends

Fresh produce can be more expensive in the winter months, which is why canned and frozen produce can be more economical depending on the season.  You’ll typically find the prices of canned and frozen peas, broccoli, spinach, peppers, and berries are less expensive than the fresh varieties when it’s cold out.  If you’re buying canned goods, you can cut down on the sodium by rinsing your veggies before you use them.

4.  Befriend your local farmer (or become a regular at the Farmers Market)

During the warmer months, you’ll often find that locally grown, fresh produce is a lot cheaper than going to the supermarket (although it depends where you live).  Locally grown fruits and veggies have so many benefits to both you and your community.  Not only can it be the more economical choice, locally grown produce is typically higher in vitamins, minerals, and taste due to less time in transit from the farm to where it’s being sold.  If you have space and a green thumb, you might also want to try your hand at growing your own fruits and veggies (but be patient, all good things take time and skill!)

5.  All hail dry beans

I used to be intimidated by dry beans because I heard they were really labor intensive to prepare.  While it’s true that dried beans require soaking (usually overnight), the actual cooking process is pretty simple (just bring water to a boil, add soaked beans, lower the heat, and in 2 hours you’ll have a big batch of delicious plant protein!).  Dried beans tend to be cheaper per pound than the canned variety.  Another benefit to dried beans is that they don’t contain added salt or preservatives and you can control the amount of seasonings you add as you cook them.

6.  Shop around

Become a master at shopping on the cheap.  Compare prices at several stores.  Some stores may have inexpensive produce, but other items may be more costly, which is why it’s totally ok to do your food shopping at a few different stores (hopefully they’re close in location though).  If you don’t have a car, you may want to do your shopping in one location, so feel free to skip this tip.  In my experience, items like peanut butter, cereal, grains, and (some) produce like bagged spinach and baby carrots are less expensive at my local Trader Joe’s, but for other items, such as apples, cucumbers, dried beans, I’ve found them cheaper at my local non-specialty store.  I also like to visit local farms whenever I can and this tends to result in the least-expensive produce finds.

 

These are just come of my tips that I’ve found the most useful from my experience.  I try to practice what I preach and I know I’ll be using this advice throughout the next year as I do my (unpaid!) Dietetic Internship.  Happy shopping, eating, and occasional treat-ing to you!

-Jess