Unreal Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

March is always an interesting month because of the unpredictable weather (at least in the northeast US).  Yesterday was the first day of spring and today there’s a major snow storm, which caused my dietetic internship program to declare today yet another snow day (I’m not complaining, although I’m really enjoying my clinical rotation).

I always find snow days are the perfect opportunity to create new recipes in the kitchen.  I decided to make these delicious cookies using Unreal chocolate covered peanut gems.  They remind me of peanut m&m’s, but they’re free artificial colorings which delights me, considering I’m a health nut with a weakness for sweet treats.  Normally, I’m not a huge candy person (I’m more into baked goods and ice cream), but I felt intrigued because this brand has been showing up in my Instagram feed and seemed to win the approval of chocolate-lovers.  I was curious to see if these lived up to the hype and I can say that they definitely do.  If you’re craving something sweet, colorful, and a little crunchy, this cookie really hits the spot 🙂

Unreal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies

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Ingredients:

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated (white) sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/4 cup 1/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened apple sauce
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup old fashioned oats
  • 4 tbsp. chocolate chips (I used trader joe’s semi-sweet)
  • 32 (2 servings) of Unreal dark chocolate peanut gems

Directions:

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F
  • Measure flour and sugars, combine in a large mixing bowl
  • Add baking soda, mix in with a fork
  • Measure and melt coconut oil in the microwave (30 seconds-1 minute)
  • Add oil to dry mixture
  • Measure and add apple sauce and vanilla extract
  • Add oats and mix everything together
  • Add chocolate chips and Unreal dark chocolate peanut gems
  • Using non-stick spray, coat a baking sheet with oil and use a spoon to scoop out the cookie dough into balls and place on the baking sheet (I made 18 cookies from this recipe)
  • Bake for 11-14 minutes
  • Remove from the oven, allow to cool, and enjoy

Is it snowing where you are?  How do you like to spend your time when there weather affects your normal routine?

-Jess

Notes from an RD-to-be

Greetings readers!  It’s been way too long since I wrote a blog post.  I’ve been extremely busy with the clinical rotation of my dietetic internship which has been the focus of my life for the past few months.  If you’ve new to this blog or you just need a recap, I’m currently a dietetic intern in order to become a Registered Dietitian (RD).  The dietetic internship consists of several rotations in different settings such as hospitals, long term care facilities, community programs, school food service, and others.  It’s a necessary step in the process of becoming an RD mandated by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND).  The process of the “rotations” is similar to how nursing students, MDs-to-be, and physician’s assistants gain experience in different areas of their fields after completing their schooling but before passing the certification tests.

Since January, I’ve been interning at a hospital and learning an immense amount about clinical dietetics.  I’ve really been enjoying this experience so far and I would love to work in a clinical setting after the internship and when I pass the RD exam (several months away, but I’m already nervous).  Every day I’m exposed to such interesting nutrition-related health problems and I’ve learned that I really enjoy being part of an interdisciplinary medical team.

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Some useful guides that I bring to the hospital each day

My typical day begins by reporting to the nutrition office.  Each day, I work with one of three preceptors who are all Registered Dietitians.  Every day there is a list of patients with some kind of nutrition-related health problem (i.e. diabetes, COPD, obesity, congestive heart failure, etc.)  that needs to be addressed by an RD.  A nutrition assessment involves reviewing the patient’s medical history, lab work, medications, and most important (for us) talking to the patient about their current diet at the hospital, their typical way of eating prior to admission, and any weight/appetite changes.  The most rewarding part of being in a hospital setting is educating the patient on how their diet affects their health.  Many people appear to be motivated to change after a hospital stay because no one enjoys being sick and it can be a wake up call to change ones’ habits.

On a personal note, I wish I could report that I’ve been living an exciting life outside of the internship, but in reality, this winter has been all about focusing on my work and trying to keep active at the gym.  Winter is my least favorite season, and I typically find that I’m less motivated to do fun activities, but I also know that staying inside all the time can be de-motivating in itself.  For me, being outside (even if it’s just a short walk) is necessary to keep the winter blues away.

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Beach life is more like burrrr life when it’s winter and you live on Long Island

How do you find motivation during the cold months?  Feel free to share, comment, here or through instagram/facebook @vitaminvalentine

-Jess

A moment to breathe

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Ah…that is my sigh of relief because I’m officially on “vacation” from my internship rotations for the next two weeks.  Yesterday was the last day of my community rotation.  If you read my last post, I’ve been working with the senior population, mostly in the scope of the meals-on-wheels program and other community programs for senior citizens.  I didn’t know what to expect of my community rotation.  Before I got into the dietetic internship, I worked in community nutrition as a nutritionist for the Women, Infants, Children (WIC) program, so I did have some experience in public health but clearly the WIC program is quite different than a program for senior citizens.  Anyway, my community rotation was fantastic.  I loved working with seniors and sharing nutrition knowledge.  If you read my last post, this rotation involved some public speaking along with making healthy baked goods to share with individuals at senior community centers, which was fun!  During this rotation, I had an amazing preceptor that truly wants interns to succeed and learn from each rotation which made it an overall positive experience.

I’m looking forward to this little break from the internship.  I’m hoping that I’ll have more time to devote to yoga, painting, running, taking long walks outside (my vitamin D levels are probably so low right now, thanks to winter), and just enjoying the holiday season.  I hope you have time to reconnect with yourself, too.

-Jess

Diary of a Dietetic Intern

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My life right now summed up in a picture- Dietetics Manuals, case studies, and healthy brain fuel!

Hello again readers!  I’m so excited to write this post/update as an RD-to-be/Dietetic Intern!  My Dietetic Internship (DI) officially started a few weeks ago with a two-week orientation that was jam-packed with projects, assignments, and learning all about what’s to come during the internship.  In case you’re reading my blog for the first time, I’m currently a Dietetic Intern and on my way to becoming a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).  The process of getting accepted into an internship was extremely competitive (my internship has an 11.8% acceptance rate!).  Not only was the application process competitive, but it was also stress-inducing, and time-consuming because I was working on my master’s thesis and working full time as I applied, so I’m elated that I even get to call myself a Dietetic Intern.  Still confused as to what the DI entails?  The DI is a commitment of supervised practice in a variety of rotations, such as clinical/hospital settings, long-term care, community nutrition organizations, renal/dialysis centers, and specific areas of nutrition/dietetics in order to train graduates to enter the field as health professionals (Registered Dietitians/Registered Dietitian-Nutritionists).

I started my first rotation this week at a Long Term Care facility gaining experience in institutional food service management.  It’s been so interesting to learn about food service management and how much work goes into budgeting a menu, planning, overseeing a kitchen, and keeping guests happy.

While I’m not going to share too much details about the specifics about what I’ve been doing while in the internship, I will share how I’ve been managing my time/stress levels and trying to remain sane outside of the DI.  If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you’ll know that I love running and yoga, so I’ve been making it a point to continue doing these things to manage stress and keep fit during this crazy process.  I’ve also been sticking to a food budget and meal planning for myself (…or trying to) because the DI is an unpaid program and a girl’s gotta eat, but also watch her wallet (and waist!).

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Trail running is my go-to stress relieving activity (and how cool are my tie-dye socks?!)

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A typical lunch on the go during this crazy time- Wasa bread sandwiches, raw veggies + hummus, and a fresh, crunchy apple

One thing that really stood out to me during orientation before the rotations actually started was some advice from the DI director– she advised us all to practice self-care in order to help us de-stress.  I really believe self-care and relaxation are so vital to health.  I also think it’s important to make time for friends, relationships, and family, especially because life is so much more than just school + professional commitments.  A few weeks ago my boyfriend and I went apple picking and it was such a a nice way to spend the day while enjoying the outdoors and getting some delicious, locally-grown fruit.  How do you stay sane during busy/stressful times?  I hope whatever  you’re working towards also brings you happiness and (some) time to relax.  I’ll be sure to keep this blog updated throughout the internship, so stop by soon for another post 🙂

 

-Jess

 

 

Relaxing and Running

Greetings readers!  It’s been a little while since I last wrote a blog post.  May was a pretty busy month for me because I graduated with two degrees!  I officially have a second bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in nutrition!  Graduating was such a huge accomplishment and a proud moment.  School has been a big part of my life for the past several years, so it feels a little weird to not be in class right now.  In September, I start the dietetic internship in order to become a Registered Dietitian, and I’ll have to take classes as a component of the program, so I should feel like my normal “academic” self in the fall.

Lately I’ve been relaxing as well getting back to some of my favorite activities that I didn’t have as much time to do this past year.  One of these activities is running.  I started running for fun and fitness in high school and it became a major stress reliever, until I got injured when I was 17.  I took a break from running and then started up again in my early 20’s, but this past year, doing cardio wasn’t my first priority.  Now that I have more free time, I’ve been running outside a bunch and going for trail runs, which I love because trail runs are challenging and I get to be surrounded by the beauty of nature.

A few weekends ago I even did a 5k race in a nature preserve with some friends, but it was definitely not my best race time!  The weather that day was 90+ heat and the humidity was high but it was fun, and that’s all that counts.

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Before the race started 

In addition to relaxing and running, I’ve also been cooking a ton and taking advantage of the farmers market season by using locally grown fruits and veggies in as many meals and snacks as possible.  If you want to see more details on my running hobby or my food creations, follow my instagram account @vitaminvalentine or keep checking my blog, as I intend to share a delicious recipe or two in the coming weeks.  Thanks for stopping by and reading my update!

-Jess

Such great heights

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The title of this blog post captures the natural high I’m currently experiencing due to so many amazing things that have happened over the past month.  I’ll start by saying that I’m officially an RD-to-be!  After years of hard work, I was matched to a super-competitive dietetic internship and I couldn’t be more elated.  In case you have no clue what I’m talking about, in order to become a Registered Dietitian in the US, you have to be accepted and complete a dietetic internship.  All applicants rank their choices of internships (similar to how med students rank their residency choices) but not all applicants get accepted.  The acceptance rate for all internships across the US is something like ~49%, so the competition is fierce and the stress during the waiting period is intense.  I’m so excited for the internship and the learning opportunities I’ll be exposed to.

The period of time leading up to “match day” (April 2nd-the day all applicants find out whether they matched or not) was quite an emotional roller-coaster.  In addition to applying to internships, I was also in the midst of writing my master’s thesis.  I was feeling really overwhelmed, but luckily I have really supportive friends and family.  One of my family friends noticed that I could use a vacation and suggested we go to Sedona, Arizona and my response was a loud “YESSSS!”.  I had been to Sedona once when I was 15 and although it was only for a few days, it left a lasting impression on me.  We booked the trip for the end of March-early April, so that I could be in full-on relaxation mode on match day.

The trip itself was in a word, magical.  No written description of Sedona can do it justice, it’s the kind of place that you actually have to go to in order to experience the beauty.  We spent roughly 75% of our waking hours outside exploring nature by hiking and meditating outside.  I found out that I got into the dietetic internship on our second-to-last day in Sedona, so that night we celebrated and it was the perfect ending to an amazing trip.

I can’t wait to share more exciting updates about the internship when it starts, and hopefully I’ll be doing more traveling in the future when my schedule allows.

-Jess

So you want to be an RD?

The field of dietetics involves the combination of nutrition, food science, and medicine (among others).

The field of dietetics involves the combination of nutrition, food science, and medicine (among others).

I decided to write this post because I think many people are confused about whether to see a nutritionist or a registered dietitian when it comes to their diets. When I tell people that I’m studying nutrition, I always add that I want to eventually become a registered dietitian (or an RD for short). Registered Dietitians are often confused with people who call themselves “nutritionists” and this is something that many RDs take issue with because the process of becoming an RD is extremely competitive, expensive, and time consuming. The process of becoming a nutritionist is a little different. In fact, right now I am a nutritionist, but the title is essentially meaningless because anyone (regardless of whether they’ve even taken a single course on nutrition) can call themselves a nutritionist.

So, what does it take to become an RD? First you must complete a bachelor’s or master’s degree in nutrition and dietetics. The required coursework is laid out by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and is called a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). The coursework includes general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, introductory nutrition classes, clinical nutrition classes, medical nutrition therapy, food science, food service management, community nutrition, nutrition education and counseling, and research. These courses are essential because RDs work in areas where they’re directly responsible for the health and well-being of their patients or clients. Many RDs also work in food service management where knowledge of food science and food safety come into play.

After completing the DPD, aspiring RDs must apply for a residency, called a dietetic internship, at specific, accredited hospitals, long-term care facilities, universities, or food service management corporations. The internship is probably the most competitive part of the process, because a majority of people do not get into an internship on the first try. The internship is also unpaid and typically lasts 6-12 months, depending on whether it is full-time or not. Students must pay for their internships, so working and saving money is a top priority for many aspiring RDs. Having a high GPA and having over one hundred hours of volunteer service in an area related to nutrition and food are some things that are expected to even be considered for an internship. After completion of the internship, aspiring RDs must take the registered dietitian exam and if they pass, they become registered dietitians.

You might be asking: why is the process so competitive?. The process is competitive because of a few reasons. One, there’s only a limited number of accredited internship positions. It takes a lot of time and effort for experienced RDs to train interns and it can be costly to hospitals and food service facilities. Another reason is that as more people realize how important diet is to health, more people are interested in becoming an RD, so it’s just a matter of the number of applicants vs. the number of spots available.

Another reason why the process is set up to be this way is because RDs need to have a knowledge of science and apply this to different populations whom they’ll be working with. When you see a nutritionist, you never know what their formal training is, what their education is in terms of applying science and research to real people, and whether or not they know how to properly assess your nutrient needs and concerns. RDs also specialize in counseling and treating certain populations and are trained to do so in their internships and/or master’s degree classes. For example, many RDs specialize in treating eating disorders, some work with the geriatric population, while others help many members of a single community. There are many knowledgeable nutritionists without the RD title, but the problem is the nutritionist title is unregulated, and that leads many unqualified individuals to give advice which may not have a client’s best interest at hand. One thing I’ve noticed about some nutritionists who aren’t RDs is that some tend to have a holistic approach to nutrition, which I can appreciate because food is so much more than what we eat! It’s what we’re made of and what directly influences our health on a physical, mental, and emotional level.

Hopefully this post has shed some light on the process of becoming an RD. I still have some time before I apply for my internship, but it’s definitely always on my mind! Have you ever had a consultation with a registered dietitian or a nutritionist? What was the experience like? I like getting feedback, so feel free to comment or write me an email on this topic (see my “contact” page).

-Jess